Review: A Kitchen in France by Mimi Thorisson

I love France. It is right at the top of the list of places I have visited that I can’t wait to go back to. Given that, the idea of a cookbook that would take me on a journey into life in France? Pretty exciting.

The first thing I noticed when I received “A Kitchen in France” was how beautiful the book was. The photographs throughout are extremely well done. They make me want to visit. They make me feel like I’m already there. They make me want to eat this food.

Next, there’s the organization of the book. It’s split into seasons. I kind of love this approach to designing a cookbook. I don’t need to see those wonderful strawberry recipes in October.

Then I dove into the content. The recipe introductions are well-done, at least in terms of making me feel like they are telling author Mimi Thorisson’s story. Unfortunately, unlike say, the amazing Dorie Greenspan, the stories here didn’t feel relatable. It felt like a fantasy world of semi-rustic French life that let’s be honest here, I’m not going to be living unless the lottery comes calling.

Finally, there are the recipes themselves. I so very much wanted the recipes to be the kind that would transport me back to those fantastical French moments. I wanted them to be recipes we could cook at home and introduce our family and friends to the wonders of France. Bottom line? They are not those kind of recipes. Throughout the book, I felt like the recipes were predominantly special occasion fare, or worse, in the “yeah, you’re never making this at home” category. I made a list of recipes from the book that I would personally feel comfortable trying at home (and I’m fairly willing to take just about any risk on a recipe that is at least sort of accessible – provided it sounds good, won’t break the bank, and walks me through the parts that sound daunting). That list contains 24 recipes. The book contains around 100. That’s not terrible, but then I reviewed the list of 24 that I would attempt:

Roast Chicken, Bouillabaisse, Couscous, Strawberries in Wine with Mascarpone Cream, Panna Cotta, Soup, Gratin, Chocolate Tart, Coq Au Vin, Madeleines, Waffles

There’s nothing wrong with including recipes for these things in a cookbook. It’s just that they are not special. There’s little in the recipes here to make me want to make them instead of the recipes I already use.

In summary, if you want a book that will make you dream of living in the French countryside, curl up with the pictures and some of the stories here. If, on the other hand, you are like me and are trying to create a family meal plan (or even host a dinner party), I think you will want to look elsewhere for your needs.

I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review.